Tofu Tuesday: “Fish” Fingers

Everybody likes fish fingers, and here’s a cruelty free version of them! A Finnish blog Vegaaninen versio had already posted a recipe for vegan “fish” fingers, and we more or less followed it. We had our “fish” fingers with roasted root vegetables and cabbage salad.

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Tofu “Fish” Fingers

250 g tofu
2,5 dl water
3/4 sheet nori seaweed
1 tsp vegetable bouillon powder
salt
1 tbsp lemon juice
1,5 tsp dill

0,75 dl wheat flour
0,75 dl water
1/4 sheet nori seaweed
1 dl dy bread crumbs
salt, pepper
1 tsp dill

oil for frying

Cut the tofu into sticks. Bring 2,5 dl water to boil. Cut the 3/4 sheet of nori into small pieces and add to the water with bouillon powder, salt, lemon juice and dill. Add tofu and marinade at least 15 minutes.

Combine wheat flour and water in a bowl. Cut the 1/4 sheet of nori into very small pieces. In another bowl combine nori, bread crumbs, salt, pepper and dill. Roll the tofu sticks first in the flour mix and then in the bread crumbs. Fry both sides in oil until golden brown.

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Bajan Tofu Balls

We were on honeymoon on Barbados last March, and we had great time there. It’s autumn here, and the colder the weather gets, the more I miss Barbados.

Deep fried fish cakes are commonly eaten on Barbados. We were also offered them on our hotel’s rum punch party, but naturally we skipped them. We bought a small Bajan cook book from Pelican Village, and among other Barbadian recipes it had also a recipe for fish cakes, so we had to try to make them with tofu. Tofu worked fine, and I think our version is easier to make, because you don’t have to boil the salted fish several times. Mustardy Bajan pepper sauce is a great accompaniment for these tofu cakes.

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Bajan Tofu Cakes

250 g tofu
1 sheet nori seaweed
1 small onion
3 garlic cloves
1 tbsp hot pepper sauce
1 tsp each: thyme, marjoram and dill
2 tsp baking powder
2,5 dl wheat flour
1,5 dl soy or oat milk
salt, black pepper and white pepper
oil for deep frying

Finely crumble the tofu in a bowl. Cut the nori in small pieces, I like to use scissors. Peel and finely chop onion and garlic. Mix all the ingredients together, add little more milk if needed.

Heat the oil and deep fry the cakes. Use two spoons to drop small balls (about tsp) to the oil and deep fry them on both sides until nicely browned. Serve with Bajan pepper sauce.

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Picnic in the Park

I’m visiting my sister in Helsinki this weekend. Saturday morning we woke up early, and went shopping as soon as the shops were open. I needed two pairs of shoes, and hadn’t find anything I like from my hometown. I found what I needed: red sneakers and black high heels. And I also bought some cruelty free cosmetics.

The weather was warm and sunny, and we decided to have a picnic. We made sushi (inari sushi and maki rolls with cucumber, avocado and carrot) and hummus and bought baguette, grapes and kalamata olives. Then we spent the rest of the day in nearby park eating, playing card games and just talking. What a great day.

Kappa Maki And Other Sushi

Today I made my first sushi. I had eaten sushi once in my omnivorous times, and it had fish in it. Miyoko Nishimoto Schinner’s Contemporary and Traditional Japanese Cooking: Simple, Delicious and Vegan had good sushi rice instructions, which I used. The book said it the amount of rice serves 6-12 people, and I thought half of it would be a dinner for two + some leftovers for lunch next day. I was wrong, we had so much sushi that it looked like we were having a Japan themed party. I guess we’re eating sushi the rest of the week.

Making the sushi was easier than I thought and it was fun. I made kappa maki (cucumber maki) and other maki rolls. I don’t know if the other rolls have Japanese names or do they eat that kind of combinations in Japan, but they were good. I served them with wasabi and Kikkoman shoyu.maki1Leftt: avocado and toasted sesame seed maki. Middle: wasabi, toasted sesame seed and bell pepper maki. Right: avocado, cucumber and toasted sesame seed maki.

maki2Left: wasabi, cucumber and bell pepper maki. Right: carrot (cooked with little bit of water, soy sauce and mirin) and toasted sesame seed maki.

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Left: avocado, cucumber and bell pepper maki. Right: kappa maki.

Sushi Rice

1l rice
1l water
1 dl sugar
2 dl sushi vinegar
1 tbsp mirin
1,5 tbsp sea salt

10 nori sheets

Put the rice to a large pot. Fill the pot with cold water, stir with your hands and pour off the water. Repeat until the water is fairly clear. Pour 1l water to the pot and soak the rice at least 30 minutes. Put the lid on (don’t remove it while cooking) and turn the heat to high. When water starts to boil, turn the heat to medium and cook 5 minutes. Turn the heat low and cook 5-10 minutes. Turn the heat off and let the rice sit 5-10 minutes.

Combine sugar, vinegar, mirin and salt in a pot, bring to boil and let cool. Stir the rice with a big spoon or spatula and add some vinegar at the same time. If the rice stops absorbing the liquid, don’t add more. Choose the fillings you want to use and prepare them: cut all the vegetables to thin sticks, deseed the cucumber, toast the sesame seeds etc.

Finally, make the maki rolls. I followed Isa and Terry’s instructions.