Seitan Saturday: Burgers

Seitan is a versatile ingredient. You can use them in soups, stews, make steaks or ribs for barbecue, make vegan sausages etc. Seitan is also great for burgers. The seitan recipe below is a variation of these awesome seitan ribz from FatFree Vegan Kitchen -blog. My sister’s comment about these burgers: “They were good. Yum yum.”

seitanburger

Barbecue Seitan Burgers

2,4 dl vital wheat gluten
2 tsp smoked paprika
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
1 tsp garlic powder
1,8 dl water
2 tbsp tahini
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tsp liquid smoke

marinade:
3 tbsp ketchup
2 tbsp syrup/molasses
1 tbsp oil
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
0,5 tsp salt
1 tsp liquid smoke
1 tsp strong mustard
chili powder or chopped chili pepper (optional)

burger buns
lettuce, tomato, onion etc.
vegan mayo, ketchup, mustard etc.

Combine vital wheat gluten, paprika, nutritional yeast and garlic powder in a bowl. Combine water, tahini, soy sauce and liquid smoke in another bowl and pour onto gluten mixture. Knead couple of minutes. Divide into 6 pieces and form them into flat “steaks”. Bake 20 minutes in 175 Celsius degrees.

Mix the marinade ingredients together and put them into a plastic bag with baked seitan. Rub the marinade all over seitans and refrigerate 30 minutes or few hours.

Fry seitan on a pan in oil, or in the summertime you can grill/barbecue them. Put a piece of seitan inside a burger bun with your favourite burger fillings.

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Flour Friday: Apple Bread

This recipe is from a 1988 Finnish magazine Nomad’s grandmother had saved for some reason. Maybe for the many recipes for breads it has, a lot of them look really great. Anyway, considering its the harvest season and apples are plentiful this year (well, at least over here they are), here’s a bread which calls for apples. It also has cinnamon, which in combination with the apples brings a wonderful holiday aroma into your house while baking!

omenaleipa

Apple Loaves

2,5 dl plant based milk (I used oat milk)
25 g yeast
1 tsp salt
0,5 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp sugar
3,5 dl grated apples
9-10 dl bread flour
0,25 dl oil

Heat the milk a little and dissolve yeast in it. Add salt, cinnamon, sugar and grated apples. Knead a dough with bread flour, add oil in the end of kneading. Cover with a towel and allow to rise.

Punch the dough down and form two bread loaves. Put them on baking sheet, cover with a towel and allow to rise again. Cut shallow slits with a sharp knife on the surface of the risen breads. Bake in 200 Celsius degrees for half an hour or until done. The bread is ready when it sounds hollow when you knock the bottom of the bread.

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Tomato Thursday: Croissants

In Finland croissant is called sarvi (horn) because of it’s shape. They can be flaky or more like bread rolls. They be filled with nearly anything, but ham, cheese and chocolate are probably most popular fillings.

horns

Tomato and Leek Croissants

filling: 
8 cm piece of leek
2 garlic cloves
2 tbsp oil
3 big tomatoes
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp thyme
½ tsp sugar
salt, pepper

dough:
2 dl soy milk or other plant based milk
25 g yeast
½ tsp salt
1 dl barley flour
5,5 dl wheat flour
100 g margarine, room temperature

sesame or poppy seeds

Chop the leek and garlic. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté leek and garlic 5 minutes. Chop the tomatoes, you can also scald them before chopping if you want to. Add tomatoes herbs and sugar to the pan and continue sautéing until tomatoes are a bit mushy and there’s not much liquid left. Allow to cool a bit.

Warm the milk and add yeast and salt. Stir until dissolved. Add barley flour and 5 dl wheat flour and stir to combine. Add margarine and knead, add little more wheat flour if needed. Roll half of the dough into a circle, about 30 cm diameter. Cut into 6 sectors, or 8 if you want to make smaller croissants. Put couple of teaspoons of tomato filling on each sector and roll them starting from the wider end and shape them as croissants. Repeat with the other half of the dough. Put croissants on baking sheet and cover with a towel, allow to rise 10-20 minutes. Brush with water and sprinkle sesame or poppy seeds on top. Bake 10-15 minutes in 225 Celsius degrees.

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Wine Wednesday: Pasta

I like cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

A deciliter or two of red wine makes tomato sauce so much better. I always add some when I make tomato sauce for pasta or pizza, if I have a bottle at home.

ww-pasta

Tomato and Vegetable Sauce

1 onion
2 garlic cloves
1 celery stalk
1 carrot
½ bell pepper
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp thyme
1 can crushed tomatoes (or 500 g fresh, chopped tomatoes)
1,5 dl red wine
1 tsp sugar
salt, pepper
fresh or dried herbs (basil, oregano)

optional additions:
fried mushrooms
1 dl red lentils
1 can beans

Chop the onion and garlic. Dice celery, carrot and bell pepper. Heat the oil in a sauce pan and sauté the onion with thyme about 5 minutes on low-medium heat. Add other vegetables and sauté another 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, red wine and sugar. If you’re using lentils add them at this point too, and some water. Simmer 30 minutes or longer, add some water if it looks like your sauce is getting too thick. If you’re using mushrooms or beans add them in the end of simmering. Season with salt, pepper and herbs and serve with pasta.

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Tofu Tuesday: “Fish” Fingers

Everybody likes fish fingers, and here’s a cruelty free version of them! A Finnish blog Vegaaninen versio had already posted a recipe for vegan “fish” fingers, and we more or less followed it. We had our “fish” fingers with roasted root vegetables and cabbage salad.

tofupuikot

Tofu “Fish” Fingers

250 g tofu
2,5 dl water
3/4 sheet nori seaweed
1 tsp vegetable bouillon powder
salt
1 tbsp lemon juice
1,5 tsp dill

0,75 dl wheat flour
0,75 dl water
1/4 sheet nori seaweed
1 dl dy bread crumbs
salt, pepper
1 tsp dill

oil for frying

Cut the tofu into sticks. Bring 2,5 dl water to boil. Cut the 3/4 sheet of nori into small pieces and add to the water with bouillon powder, salt, lemon juice and dill. Add tofu and marinade at least 15 minutes.

Combine wheat flour and water in a bowl. Cut the 1/4 sheet of nori into very small pieces. In another bowl combine nori, bread crumbs, salt, pepper and dill. Roll the tofu sticks first in the flour mix and then in the bread crumbs. Fry both sides in oil until golden brown.

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Moroccan Monday: Couscous

As one of our themes was Moroccan Monday, there had to come a day when couscous would be in the main role. We have no statistics to back this claim up, but looking at various cookbooks and recipes online, couscous seems to be really popular in their cuisine.

And why not? It’s rather versatile and keeps hunger away for long periods of time. (I guess this might explain its historical popularity among desert-dwelling people.)

marokkolainen

Fava Beans and Vegetables

1 onion
1 bell pepper
1 zucchini
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp cumin
0,5 tsp turmeric
0,5 tsp cinnamon
0,5 tsp all spice
0,25 tsp cloves
0,5 tsp cayenne (or to taste)
2 big tomatoes
4 dl fava beans
salt, pepper

Dice onion, bell pepper and zucchini. Heat the oil in a pan or pot and sauté diced vegetables with spices about 5 minutes. Meanwhile dice the tomatoes. Add the tomatoes and fava beans to the pan and simmer 15-20 minutes or until vegetables are ready and tomatoes are a bit mushy. Season with salt and pepper and serve with herb couscous.

Herb Couscous

4 dl water
pinch of salt
4 dl couscous
4 tbsp chopped fresh mint
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp olive oil

Bring the water to boil. Add salt and couscous, remove from heat and let sit covered until the couscous has absorbed all the water. Fluff with a fork. Add chopped herbs, lemon juice and olive oil.

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Slowfood Sunday: Sweet coconut curry

Sundays are great days, especially if you have absolutely nothing to do, and can just concentrate on relaxing. That’s why I’m also a big sucker for foods which you can just throw together and put in the oven to prepare. I was looking around for something nice to make, and found (via Pinterest possiby, or something, I can’t remember) this recipe in a site for healthy living. So if the food tastes good and is healthy, that’s even better!

I must say I was really suspicious of making a dish like this without any chili pepper in it, but decided to be nice this time and play by the rules… Used a tablesauce (Tabasco Habanero) afterwards, which brought a very nice sour contrast to the otherwise sweetish taste!

intialainen

 

Sweet Potato and Chickpea Curry with Coconut Rice

vegetable oil
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp minced ginger
4 dl cooked chickpeas (roughly the same as one can)
1 can of chopped tomatoes
5 dl cauliflower florets
1 sweet potato, peeled and diced
1 can coconut milk
some vegetable broth
1 tbsp garam masala
1/2 tbsp curry powder
1 tsp salt
4 dl spinach or nettle, chopped (lesser amount will do just fine, this isn’t essential for the food)

Coconut rice:
3,5dl parboiled rice (original recipe calls for basmati rice, but parboiled was the only I had)
1 can light coconut milk
1 dl water
1/4 tsp salt

Heat up some oil in a pan, and add the onion, garlic and ginger into the pan. Saute for some time until nice and caramelized. Combine all other curry ingredients except the spinach with the onion mix. If you’re like us, you’ll use a cast-iron pot for making this food. Word of recommendation: leave the sweet potato for the last, it’s easier to mix everything together if your pot isn’t full of sweet potato chunks. Warm up the oven to 150-175 C and let the food cook there for five to six hours.

Making the coconut rice is pretty easy, throw all the ingredients together in a pot, warm until it boils, turn the heat down and let it cook under a lid. While the rice is slowly getting ready (the time depends on the type of rice you use), you might want to add the spinach into your cast-iron pot, mix it a bit and put it back into the oven until you’re ready to eat. When the rice is ready, you’re good to enjoy your curry.

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