Jerusalem artichoke soup

Here we go with yet another simple but nice food from the old cookbook. Jerusalem artichoke is a funny root vegetable. It was a very common one over here before the introduction of potato, and even for a long time (several centuries) after that. Yet during the last 100 years it has been somewhat forgotten, quite likely due to potato being providing a better harvest.

For us and our community garden project, this very rainy summer was a quite a disaster, the amount of potato we were able to raise was far from last year’s huge success. However, this might be mitigated by the jerusalem artichoke which is growing wildly around the area where we have our small plot of land.

So, while harvesting the last batch of our own potatos, we also collected a small bag of jerusalem artichokes. Of course, the logical next step was to find some food from the old books which uses them, and here we go with the soup. It’s simple, tasty, open up for variations according to your own tastes and everything. I just hope you don’t have to buy jerusalem artichokes from the market, or if you have to, I really hope they aren’t as expensive as around here, which is quite ridiculous considering you can find them growing wild here and there…

Hope you enjoy!

Creamy Jerusalem Artichoke Soup

1,5 l vegetable broth
1 l Jerusalem artichokes
2 tbsp margarine
3 tbsp wheat flour
salt, white pepper
1 dl oat or soy cream

Peel the Jerusalem artichokes and put them immediately into cold water to prevent them getting dark. Bring the broth to boil and cook the Jerusalem artichokes until soft. Puré with a blender. Melt the margarine in a pot and sauté the flour in it for a minute. Add some soup, mix well, add more soup, mix again and add the rest of the soup and mix. Slowly boil 10 minutes, stirring often. Add water if the soup looks too thick (the original recipe called for 2,5 l water, but we used 1,5, which was enough). Add cream, season with salt and pepper and heat thoroughly.

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